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Former staff

Cristina Andenna, Univ.-Prof. Dr.

After studying Philosophy and History at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano (Italy), I held a scholarship at the Istituto italiano per gli studi storici “Benedetto Croce” in Naples from 1996-97. I then received a doctoral fellowship at the Università Cattolica di Milano, where I completed my Ph.D. in 2001 with a thesis on the development and social establishment of a congregation of canons regular in northern Italy. This work also laid the foundation for my later research on the history of religious orders, which has focused, inter alia, on processes of institutionalization, the formation of collective identities, and the construction of memory. This work has focused particularly on canons regular, hermits and recluses, and mendicant orders, as well as questions of female religiosity. From 2001 to 2003, I held positions as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Università degli studi di Padova and as a Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation working in the area of “Institutionality and Historicity” (SFB 537) at the Technical University of Dresden. From 2004 until 2012, I was a Ricercatrice (Assistant Professor) at the Università degli studi della Basilicata. During this time, I also held substitute Chairs at the Technical University of Dresden and at the University of Trier and spent another two months as a Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at the University of Eichstätt. Beginning in 2012, I worked as a research coordinator and managing director at Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG) at the Technical University of Dresden. During this time, I was a visiting Fellow for three months at the International College for Research in the Humanities (IKGF) on the project “Fate, Freedom and Prediction: Coping strategies in East Asia and Europe” at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg and I hold a short Visiting Professorship at the University of Konstanz. In 2016, I completed my habilitation at the Technical University of Dresden with a thesis on institutionalization processes and legitimation strategies in southern Italy, and I received the Venia Legendi for Medieval History. In this research, I was particularly interested in moments of dynastic change and the strategies employed by new rulers to legitimize and socially anchor their rule. In November 2020, I was appointed to the Karl Franzens-University in Graz, where I have been researching and teaching as a Professor of Medieval History since December 2020.

My research focuses primarily on the High and Late Middle Ages, but also includes the Early Middle Ages. Social and cultural approaches as well as a pan-European perspective play an important role in my work. In addition, I have a regional focus on the political, institutional and social history of northern and southern Italy. In the last years, I have been intensively involved in research on women's and gender history, examining, for example, the role of queens in the Middle Ages.

Main research areas:

• History of religious orders and communities from a European perspective (early to late Middle Ages)

• Rulership, suitability and legitimation of power

• Hagiography and memoria

• Political and institutional history of Southern Italy

• Women's and gender history

• European urban history

• Papacy and Church history

Curriculum vitae

Publications

 

Maximilian Bacher, BA

Maximilian Bacher war von Oktober 2021 bis Ende Juni 2022 als Studentischer Mitarbeiter im Arbeitsbereich Geschichte des Mittelalters an der Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz tätig.

 

 

 

 

Lorenz Bogdanovics, Mag.phil.

From March 2018 to June 2019, Lorenz Bogdanovics was a student research assistant for General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz.

He was born in Graz in 1993 and, after earning his higher education entrance qualification at BORG Hartberg secondary school in 2011, completed his mandatory civil service at Lebenshilfe Steiermark. He enrolled in the teacher training programme for the school subjects German and history, social studies and political education at the University of Graz in 2012. After working as a student assistant in teaching at the Institute of German Studies, German language section, he joined the FWF project “Variantengrammatik des Standarddeutschen” (Variant grammar of standard high German) under the direction of Arne Ziegler from July 2015 to September 2016. Throughout his career at the Institute of German Studies, he was also involved in organising and implementing the international Youth Languages conference and the Humboldt College “Wege des Deutschen” (Paths of German) as well as the publication of the conference proceedings for Youth Languages in 2016.

As a scholarship holder of the vice rectorate for studies and teaching, he completed the course for academic writing advisors organised by the University of Klagenfurt from 2014 to 2016 and has since been working as a scientific writing advisor at the Writing Centre of the University of Graz.

 

Veronika Drescher, MMag. Dr.

MMag. Dr. Veronika Drescher war seit August 2022 am Institut für Geschichte für den Arbeitsbereich Mittelalter tätig.

 

 

 

 

Marlene Fößl, BA MA

Marlene Fößl was a student research assistant for General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz from August 2017 to July 2018.
She was born in Upper Austria in 1994 and, after earning her higher education entrance qualification at BG Gmunden secondary school in 2012, began studying history in Graz. After completing her bachelor's degree programme in 2015 with a thesis on the history of the Middle Ages, she continued to study the master's degree programme. From 2015 to 2017, she worked as a student assistant in teaching in the history library. Since the second year of her studies, she has also been a member of the International Students of History Association (ISHA), Graz section, where she was active on the board for two terms.

 

Michael Marc Hammer, Mag. phil. Dr. phil. BA

Michael Hammer was born in Güssing in 1988 and earned his higher education entrance qualification at BORG Güssing secondary school before enrolling in the teaching training programme for the school subjects French and history, social studies and political education in the winter semester of 2008/09. He completed the degree programme as Mag. Phil. in 2013. At the same time, he studied in the Bachelor's Degree Programme History, graduating in 2012.

From summer semester 2015 to winter semester 2016/17, he was a lecturer for General History of the Middle Ages at the Institute of History of the University of Graz as well as an assistant professor. He enrolled in the doctoral programme in 2014, graduating from the University of Graz in 2016 with a doctoral thesis titled “Von gemeinen Frauen und guten Fräulein. Das österreichische Frauenhauswesen im Spätmittelalter und in der Frühen Neuzeit” (The common women of the “Frauenhaus“: Austrian brothels in the Late Middle Ages and the early modern period) at the University of Graz under the guidance of Käthe Sonnleitner.

For his doctoral project, Michael Hammer conducted research in various city and state archives, primarily in the city archives of Bolzano and Merano as well as in the South Tyrolean State Archives.

His research interests include questions concerning social and gender history, mainly of the late Middle Ages and urban areas, particularly prostitution, living environments of ‘marginalised groups’ and ‘the marginalised’ as well as the tension between norm and deviance in late medieval urban society, primarily in today's Austria and South Tyrol.

 

Reinhard Härtel, O. Univ.-Prof. i.R. Dr. phil.

Reinhard Härtel was professor of General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz from March 1998 to September 2011.

He was born in Meersburg near Lake Constance in 1945. He completed his doctoral programme at the University of Graz in 1969, and went on to become an assistant at the University of Graz, first at the Institute of Austrian Legal History and from 1971 at the Institute of Historical Auxiliary Sciences (since 1979 the Research Institute of Historical Methodology). In 1979, he qualified as a professor of Medieval History and in 1984 for Historical Auxiliary Sciences. In 1988, he was appointed head of the Research Institute of Historical Methodology, and full professor of General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences in 1998. He was guest lecturer at the University of Klagenfurt in 1985, a guest professor at the University of Trento in 1998, and took on a short-term guest professorship at the University of Pisa in 1999 and 2002. His office as head of the research institute ended in 1999 when the necessary legal requirements for the position expired. He retired from active work at the university in 2011.

His research on ​​the history of the Middle Ages initially focused on regional studies of the Eastern Alps, including his habilitation thesis from 1979 (published in 1985), which addresses both constitutional history and national awareness. From time to time, he concentrated his research on the history of coins and money (partly in cooperation with the Coin Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts in Vienna) as well as medieval anthroponymy (as part of the project network “Genèse médiévale de l'anthroponymie moderne”). The latter research foci were also reflected in the acquisition of third-party funds and in the planning and scientific management of conferences (1992 and 1995, in Friesach, organised jointly with the University of Klagenfurt). Outside of these research areas, he was involved in a conference on “Akkulturation im Mittelalter” (Acculturation in the Middle Ages; 2010, on the island of Reichenau). Furthermore, he presented noteworthy works on the upper Adriatic region and various individual studies, such as the itinerarium of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI, the Italian policy of King John of Bohemia or the reign of King Ottokar II of Bohemia in the area of ​​today's Austria are also noteworthy.

In the field of historical auxiliary sciences, his research focus was and still is on diplomatics, with particular emphasis on the revision of the collection of documents of the state of Styria “Urkundenbuch der Steiermark” (on behalf of the Historische Landeskommission für Steiermark (Historical State Commission for Styria)) and on analysis and editing in the documented tradition of the Patriarchate of Aquileia. He was able to obtain third-party funding for both endeavours (FWF and ÖNB). A separate edition book series was established for the Aquileia project within the framework of the Austrian Academy of Sciences: Volume 1, published in 1985, is also a postdoctoral thesis, volume 2 was published in 2005, and volume 3 was published in 2017 together with Cesare Scalon. In addition to the series of volumes, an edition on contracts between the Patriarchate and the Republic of Venice was published in 2005 and numerous preparatory and accompanying studies on diplomatics and source analysis were conducted. His work on both the “northern” and the “southern” document system provided the basis for the textbook/compendium “Notarielle und kirchliche Urkunden im frühen und hohen Mittelalter” (Notarial and ecclesiastical documents in the early and high Middle Ages; 2011), the first reference of such a representation to the whole “Latin Europe”. Individual works deal with inscriptions, genealogy, heraldry, historical cartography, edition and register technology, library history and the like. His research stays in Germany, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Croatia and especially in Italy (including the Vatican City) are primarily related to auxiliary-scientific projects ‒ the same applying to lecturing (in German, English, French and Italian). 

Memberships: Historische Landeskommission für Steiermark (Historical State Commission for Styria; since 1988), Commission Internationale de diplomatique (since 1989), Konstanzer Arbeitskreis für mittelalterliche Geschichte (Constance Working Group for Medieval History; since 2005), several regional historical commissions in Italy. Corresponding member of the Slovenska Akademija znanosti in umetnosti (Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts) since 2019.

Publications by o. Univ.-Prof. Dr. phil. Reinhard Härtel

 

Magdalena Joham

Magdalena Maria Joham was a student research assistant for General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz from March 2017 to February 2018.

She was born in Wolfsberg in 1995 and earned her higher education entrance qualification at the BORG/BRG Wolfsberg secondary school in 2013. In 2013, she enrolled in the teacher training programme for the school subjects German and history, social studies and political education at the University of Graz. In addition, she began her Bachelor's Degree Programme History in 2014. In the summer semester 2016, she ventured into the Middle Ages research field as a student assistant, teaching in the lecture series “Introduction to Medieval History”.

 

Sabine Kaspar, Dr. phil.

Sabine Kaspar has been working on a project headed by Professor Reinhard Härtel involving the revision of the second volume of the Urkundenbuch der Steiermark (collection of documents of the state of Styria) since July 2013.

She was born in Salzburg in 1981 and studied history and English in Graz. She graduated with honours in 2006 (diploma thesis: “Ein Leben aus zweiter Hand? The Book of Margery Kempe” (A Second Hand Life? The Book of Margery Kempe)). She started teaching as an assistant at the Institute of History from June 2007 to December 2008. For her doctoral thesis titled “Mulieres Sanctae. Zur Bedeutung charismatischer Begnadungen in spätmittelalterlichen Quellen” (Mulieres Sanctae. On the significance of charismatic gifts in late medieval sources), she received a DOC grant from the Austrian Academy of Sciences. In June 2013, she graduated from the doctoral programme with honours.

In addition to her work on the collection of documents of the state of Styria, she also works as a lecturer (most recently on behalf of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) and was a tutor for the course “Universität und Nationalsozialismus nach Ende des Krieges. Eine multiperspektivische Annäherung” (University and National Socialism after WW2. A Multi-Perspective Approach” in the winter semester 2015/16, resulting in the anthology titled “Die Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz und der lange Schatten des Hakenkreuzes. 15 Beiträge von Studierenden und TutorInnen” (The University of Graz and the shadow of the swastika. 15 contributions by students and tutors), which was published in February 2017.

 

Amelia Kennedy, PhD

Amelia Kennedy has been a University Assistant in Medieval History since May 2021. She majored in History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and then received her Ph.D. in 2020 from Yale University. Under the guidance of Paul Freedman and Anders Winroth, she wrote a dissertation entitled “Growing Old in a Cistercian Monastery, c. 1100-1300,” which lays the foundation for her first book project, “Aging Gracefully: Cultural Attitudes Toward Old Age in Medieval Monastic Communities, c. 1100-1400.” This research integrates approaches from aging studies, disability studies, and the medical humanities within the context of medieval monasticism. More generally, she is interested in the social and cultural history of Europe during the High Middle Ages, as well as the role of women in religious life. She has published an article on abbatial retirement among the Cistercians in Radical History Review and has an article on “crip time” in the monastic infirmary forthcoming in the Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies. She is currently beginning new research on the theme of exile in monastic life, with a particular focus on women’s communities and concepts of exile.

Main research areas:

  • Monastic history
  • Old age and the life-cycle
  • Disability studies
  • Women’s history: nuns, abbesses, recluses, and religious women
  • Digital humanities

 

Carina Kernmaier, BEd

Carina Kernmaier was a student research assistant for General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz from September 2019 to August 2020.

She was born in Judenburg in 1995 and earned her higher education entrance qualification at the HLW St. Veit/Glan secondary school in June 2015. In the winter semester of 2015, she enrolled in the teacher training programme of the University of Graz for the school subjects Italian and history, social studies and political education, which she completed in summer 2019. ​

 

Anna Lidor-Osprian, Mag. phil.

Anna Lidor-Osprian was born in Voitsberg in 1988 and was assistant professor at the General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences section of the University of Graz from August 2017 to September 2020. After earning her higher education entrance qualification at the BG/BRG Köflach secondary school, she enrolled in the teacher training programme for the school subjects German and history, social studies and political education in Graz from 2007 to 2013. She wrote her diploma thesis on “Peter Falckners Fechtbuch ‘Künste zu ritterlicher were’: Edition und Kommentar der spätmittelalterlichen Handschrift KK5012 des Kunsthistorischen Museums in Wien” (Peter Falkner’s fencing manual ‘Künste zu ritterlicher were’. Edition and commentary of the medieval manuscript KK5012 at the Museum of Fine Arts in Vienna). From 2013 to 2017, she lived in Israel, where she worked as a lecturer for the OeAD Austrian Agency for International Cooperation at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheba.

 

 

Caroline Maier

Caroline Maier war von März 2021 bis Ende Juni 2022 als Studentische Mitarbeiterin im Arbeitsbereich Geschichte des Mittelalters an der Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz tätig.

 

 

 

 

Anna Maria Petutschnig, BA

From March to July 2017, Anna Maria Petutschnig was a student research assistant for General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz. In the summer semester 2018, she worked as a tutor for the course “Introduction to Medieval History”. She was born in Spittal/Drau in 1994 and earned her higher education entrance qualification at the BG Porcia secondary school in Spittal/Drau in 2012. She enrolled in the Bachelor’s Degree Programme History at the University of Graz in 2012, graduating in 2016. Additionally, she began the teacher training programme for the school subjects Latin and history, social studies and political education in 2013.

 

Corinna Rettenegger, BA MA

Corinna Rettenegger was born in Graz in 1988. She enrolled in the Bachelor’s Degree Programme History at the University of Graz, graduating in 2013 with a thesis on medieval estates of the realm and their effects on people’s everyday life.

Subsequently, she worked as a teaching assistant (2014/15) and tutor (2017), and further participated in the workshop organised by the section Middle Ages for the 150th anniversary of the Institute of History in 2015.

She is currently working on her master's thesis titled “Soziale Gruppen und Geschlechterräume in den Polizeiverordnungen des 13. bis 15. Jahrhunderts in Nürnberg und Straßburg” (Social groups and gender spheres as depicted in the police ordinances from the 13th to the 15th century in Nuremberg and Strasbourg).

 

Tina Scheichl, Mag.phil.

Tina Scheichl was student research assistant for General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz from October 2018 to July 2019.

She was born in Steyr, Upper Austria, in 1995, earning her higher education entrance qualification at the BG Werndlpark Steyr secondary school in June 2013. In October 2013, she enrolled in the teacher training programme for the school subjects Spanish and history, social studies and political education at the University of Graz. She has been a mentor for pre-academic writing required to earn the new higher education entrance qualification since January 2018. In 2016, she completed a semester abroad in Colombia, which further deepened her interest in South American history, culture and language. Her master’s thesis also deals with this subject area as evidenced by the preliminary title “Asien in Amerika. Über das vorherrschende Asienbild auf den vier Amerikafahrten des Christoph Kolumbus” (Asia in America. The prevailing image of Asia on the four America trips of Christopher Columbus).

 

Romedio Schmitz-Esser, Univ.-Prof. Dr. phil.

Romedio Schmitz-Esser was professor at the General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences section of the University of Graz from January 2017 to September 2020. He was head of the Institute of History from 1 October 2018 to September 2020. Since 1 October 2020 Romedio Schmitz-Esser has been professor of Medieval History of the Ruperto Carola University Heidelberg.

 

 

Käthe Sonnleitner, Ao. Univ.-Prof. i.R. Dr. phil.

Käthe Sonnleitner was associate professor at the Institute of History/Middle Ages section from April 1992 to October 2015. She studied history and German studies in Graz and worked as a freelancer for the Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in 1975. She graduated from the doctoral programme in 1976 with a doctoral thesis on “Fluranalytische Untersuchungen an ‘-hofen’-Orten der Steiermark” (Analytical investigations Flur-type plots of rural land in towns with the suffix "-hofen" in Styria), also receiving a promotional award from the Historische Landeskommission für Steiermark (Historical State Commission for Styria). From 1976 to 1978, she worked at the Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut für Stadtgeschichtsforschung (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Urban History Research) in Linz, then as a member of academic staff for the new edition of the Urkundenbuch der Steiermark (collection of documents of the state of Styria) led by Univ.-Prof. Dr. Friedrich Hausmann. In 1980, she became a contract assistant professor at the Research Institute of Historical Methodology of the University of Graz, and assistant professor at the Institute of History in 1988. In 1992, she earned her teaching qualification for General History of the Middle Ages. Her habilitation thesis was titled “Die Darstellung des bischöflichen Selbstverständnisses in den Urkunden des Mittelalters” (The representation of episcopal self-understanding in the documents of the Middle Ages) (Archiv für Diplomatik, 37, 1991). She is a member of the Working Group for Equal Opportunities, was head of the Institute of History from September 2006 to October 2011 and head of the doctoral programme Interdisciplinary Gender Studies from 2010 to 2015.

Main research areas: Settlement history, urban history, social history, gender history, history of mentality, historiography of the Ottonian period.

Aaron Vanides, PhD

Aaron Vanides was born in Palo Alto, California, in 1988, and he was assistant professor of General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz from February 2019 to September 2020. His main research focuses on the intellectual and cultural history of the later Middle Ages in Central and Northern Europe. He graduated from the University of Chicago in German, Medieval Studies and Liberal Arts in 2010. He earned his doctoral degree in the interdisciplinary programme for Medieval Studies at Yale University under Professor Dr.Anders Winroth with the doctoral thesis titled “The Ends of Authority at the Council of Constance, 1414-1418” in 2018. This thesis is the basis of his current research project, The Authority of Speech in the Later Middle Ages, which examines the development, dissemination and transmission of rhetoric and the spoken word in a codified form as the key feature of an era spanning the ages between the outbreak of the Great Occidental Schism in 1378 and the Counter-Reformation of the 16th century. From 2011 to 2015, in addition to his teaching and research activities, he also worked as an assistant on a long-term project involving the critical edition of the First Recension of the Decretum Gratiani (one of the foundations of modern legal theory), which will be published in Monumenta Iuris canonici by Bibliotheca Apostolica publishing. In this context, he was also Head Digital Assistant of a group of research assistants within the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's interdisciplinary third-party funded project “Digitally Enabled Scholarship with Medieval Manuscripts” Furthermore, he works as a scientific translator. His translations include projects such as the book Meister Eckhart: Philosopher of Christianity (with Anne Schindel; Yale University Press, 2015) by Kurt Flasch. Essays on Nikolaus von Kues and canonistics in the late Middle Ages are in print. He has completed research and study stays at Stanford University, the Free University of Berlin, the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (as a DAAD scholarship holder) and the University of the Faroe Islands, as well as at the Bavarian State Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and at other manuscript and archive collections in Europe and North America. 

 

 

Philipp Zwick, Mag.phil.

Philipp Zwick was student assistant for General History of the Middle Ages and Historical Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Graz in the winter semester 2019/2020.

He was born in Villach in 1995, earning his higher education entrance qualification at the BORG Hermagor secondary school in 2013. In the winter semester 2014/15, he enrolled in the teacher training programme for the school subjects German and history, social studies and political education at the University of Graz. In the summer semester 2019 he worked as a tutor for the course “Introduction to the History of Austria”.

 

Kontakt

Ass.-Prof. Mag. Dr.phil.

Johannes Gießauf

Institut für Geschichte

Institut für Geschichte

Phone:+43 316 380 - 2381


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